Baking, blasting, crack checking block; resizing rods for Cadillac 365 | Redline Update #73

Davin offers an update on the status of the various bits and also items of our projects laying around the store. After that he heads off to Thirlby Machine Shop to sign in on the development of the Cadillac 365 V8 heads as well as block. The filthy and corroded cast iron cleaned up nicely after a great bake and also grain blast, yet what will the decision be on the general condition of these important pieces of our task? Any kind of fractures? Will the cylinders tidy up at.030" over?

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31 Replies to “Baking, blasting, crack checking block; resizing rods for Cadillac 365 | Redline Update #73”

  1. I live in Holland MI, I drove past the big Hagerty place last time I was in Travers. I know exactly where the Trail Buddy place is in Zeeland.

  2. I really enjoy seeing the machine shop work. To many it is a place full of grease and grime…but they would be surprised by the skill and precision that is required.

    1. When you’re looking at machine shops to do work for you theres 2 things that will tell you you’re in the right place. 1 they’ve got more work then they know what to do with and 2 the place smells like iron and oil. Got them both you’ve found the right place.

  3. It’s good to know that Hagerty gives so much back to the automotive enthusiast community, and Davin is a huge part of that.

    Glad to know the premiums I pay are put to such good use.

    1. An it’s great seeing them in a machine shop ,so some people can see what their process is,cause those shops are fewer as times go on..

  4. Hope you plan to drill a small hole at the end of the crack before you start welding , that would stop the crack from advancing any further.

    1. There are only two practical ways to weld cast iron that I know of: 1) Oven welding. 2) Stitch welding. With oven welding the entire piece is heated nearly to the melting point of cast iron, the part is welded and then allowed to slowly cool. The other method involves ‘stitching’. With the stitching method, a series of holes are drilled along the crack…yes, at the ends of the crack as well…the holes are tapped and steel pins are screwed into the holes. At this point a bead of laid down between the pins. When everything is cool, the weld is ground down and smoothed.

    1. No, because you ground some all the way around. You can either change the profile and lift by removing more on the small end or just redo a stock profile. So the base circle (round section) and the lobe are both regrind making it smaller a bit. The valve adjustment will compensate for the lost of material.

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